CCMAD Joins Nation in Celebrating National Mosquito Awareness Week

So far in 2019, there have only been a few isolated cases of West Nile Virus and no major outbreaks. Although we hope that these numbers hold, we do expect the number of cases to increase over the coming months and urge the public to stay vigilant about mosquitoes and the early warning symptoms of West Nile Virus.

The mosquito season is greatly compounded by the beginning of the rainy summer and hurricane season in the Southern United States. Fortunately, here in Los Angeles we are spared much of the rain, allowing us to effectively mitigate the threat posed by these deadly insects.

Furthermore, one of the major mosquito breeding sources in our community – the Compton Creek – was recently cleaned and dredged, achieving the dual goals of flood control and eliminating stagnant pools of water.

Our hard-working staff achieved this long-sought goal through advocacy and coordination among numerous state, local, and federal agencies. As a publicly-funded agency, we are dedicated to spending tax dollars wisely; preemptive projects and raising awareness are some of the most effective tools in our toolbox to achieving our goal of protecting the Public’s Health.

As always, we invite you to join us in tackling our shared-responsibility to protect our community from mosquitoes and the potentially deadly diseases that they carry. Partner with us by following these five simple tips:

  1. DUMP & DRAIN STANDING WATER

Get rid of standing water in and around your property – that’s where mosquitoes breed.

  1. AVOID DUSK & DAWN

Stay indoors during the hours of dusk and dawn, when mosquitoes are most active.

  1. DEFEND YOURSELF

Protect yourself from mosquito bites – wear long-sleeve shirts and pants along with approved insect repellent containing DEET, Picaridin, IR 3535, or Oil of Lemon Eucalyptus.

  1. INSPECT YOUR PROPERTY

Ensure rain barrels and window screens are sealed and in good repair to prevent mosquitoes from entering.

  1. REPORT DEAD BIRDS

Before handling and disposing of dead birds, report them by calling 877-WNV-BIRD (968-2473).